The Road Not Taken

Marlon Brando’s private island Tetiaroa

“The Polynesian people have a contribution to make to the rest of the world. Tahiti does not have the reputation it enjoys without reason. Tahiti is not pie in the sky, it is real. It is not a myth so much as a way of looking at life … a life that can be described as chiffon in the wind.”
– Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando was passionate about preserving Tetiaroa’s natural beauty, astonishing biodiversity and cultural richness. He also was a visionary, and had great plans for Tetiaroa as a model for sustainability and a place where world-shaping ideas might spawn.

Marlon Brando first came to Tetiaroa while filming Mutiny on the Bounty and was immediately smitten with the island’s beauty and the sense it gave of being closer to paradise. Enchanted by the Polynesian way of life (and especially by leading lady Tarita, the love of his life), he resolved to own the island and succeeded in this goal in 1967. It was in this natural wonderland that he settled down, and finally found a home.

Despite his disappointments in business, Brando was passionate about preserving Tetiaroa’s natural beauty, astonishing biodiversity and cultural richness. In 1999 he asked Richard Bailey, a long-time resident of Tahiti who would create and operate some of the region’s finest resorts, to help him conceive a plan that would help Brando achieve his dream. Together, Brando and Bailey formed a partnership to pursue a vision of creating the world’s first and foremost post-carbon resort—an island where innovative new technologies would enable a self-sustaining luxury environment for hotel guests, scientific research and full-time residents. The Brando is the legacy of that partnership.

My niece’s hand



My niece’s hand, originally uploaded by jonrawlinson.

Sunset in Moorea, French Polynesia

Settin up a Gopro shot on a Landrover

The stunning blue water above Bora Bora

My shooting location today….for a new project…WOW.